skip to Main Content

Sight is vital to our health and well-being.

In fact, people fear vision loss more than losing hearing, memory, speech or even a limb. Vision research is helping every day — producing exciting new insights about eye disease, developing innovations to restore sight, and driving clinical breakthroughs that are helping all of us see the future more clearly.

News Icon - Green stroked circle with megaphone inside

IN THE NEWS

Twitter Feed Icon - Green stroked circle with Twitter logo inside

TWITTER FEED

Senior man being tested for Alzheimers

If you’re diabetic and you’ve had “the talk” with your doctor, you already know your vision is at risk, over time. In fact, diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults. However, vision researchers are now on the verge of adding another powerful weapon to our defenses against this sight thief – one that doesn’t merely retard the progression of DR, but rather prevents it altogether.

More Stories

David A. Antonetti, PhD, is the Roger W. Kittendorf Research Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. His research areas include angiogenesis and vascular diseases as well as diabetes and metabolic disorders. More specifically, he investigates the formation and loss of the blood-brain and blood-retinal barriers with the goal of developing new treatments for diabetes-related vision loss.

More Visionaries

Foundation Fighting Blindness Logo - Dark blue and turquoise sans-serif type

Hope from Home: A United Night to Save Sight: February 28 7:00pm EST

Hope from Home: A United Night to Save Sight is an exciting and interactive virtual experience featuring incredible entertainment, amazing auction items, and the opportunity to connect with others from the comfort of your own home.

Media inquiries.

VISION RESEARCH IS AN INVESTMENT IN A BETTER FUTURE

As NIH Director Frances Collins put it, “Due to the architecture, accessibility, and the elegance of the eye, vision research has always been a few steps ahead in biomedical research.”

Back To Top